Crestliner 1750 Bass Hawk Review

The 2017 1750 Crestliner Bass Hawk is an all new model that bass anglers have got to know about.


This article originally appeared on boats.com. Reprinted by permission.


We have a pretty healthy selection of Crestliner fishing boat reviews on boats.com, but most of them share one thing in common: they’re multi-species boats, designed for general fishing as opposed to being focused in on any one species or style of fishing. Crestliner does, of course, have pure bass boats in their PT and VT lines. What would happen if you took a bass boat and melded it with the multi-species Hawk line? The 2017 1750 Bass Hawk is your answer. Join us for an in-depth look at this all new model, in this video boat review.

One of the important things about this boat which we weren’t able to examine in detail during the video review is construction. It’s important to know that Crestliner uses a four-piece hull design with formed-in strakes in the aluminum hull and an extruded, full-length keel. The seams are all welded, and feature a tongue-and-groove interlocking system. Gunwales are also extruded aluminum, and have the SureMount mounting system designed in. Decking is aluminum, and the boat is wood-free. The transom gets double-welded and reinforced. Crestliner backs up this construction method with a limited lifetime warranty on all main-seam welds, and a three-year bow-to-stern warranty.

Blasting across the lake at speeds in excess of 50 MPH, the Bass Hawk felt plenty solid underfoot.
Blasting across the lake at speeds in excess of 50 MPH, the Bass Hawk felt plenty solid underfoot.

Another thing many people don’t realize is just how long Crestliner has been building boats, and just how much experience they have at it. Their history goes all the way back to 1946. You can see it the knowledge that comes with this sort of experience in details like that rod box we liked so much. Not only does it lock, have tubes to protect the rod tips, and have oodles of capacity, it also has a pair of gas-assist struts that hold the hatch up. Notice the use of nylock locking nuts, of their attachment points. And notice the hinges, which run the full length of the hatch.

Another place experience shines is at the helm station. Many small aluminum boats like this one don’t plan ahead for an electronics installation, and a chartplotter/fishfinder has to be binnacle-mounted. But Crestliner dedicated a flat in the center of the helm, so you can have flush-mounted electronics. Same goes for the foresight shown in including the electronics flat at the bow, something serious bassers demand.

How many 17-foot aluminum fishing boats have flush-mounted electronics at the helm? Not many.
How many 17-foot aluminum fishing boats have flush-mounted electronics at the helm? Not many.

As we mentioned in the video, aluminum wont’ be the first construction material choice of all bass anglers. Its light weight does mean the boat gets blown around more easily than a fiberglass boat, and foot for foot fiberglass tends to ride better. But between the easier trailering, lower initial and repair costs (note—even with maximum power and a trailer this rig barely breaks $32K), and the faster speeds with similar horsepower, for many people, a boat like the 1750 Bass Hawk is going to be exactly what they’re looking for. Is it the ideal boat for you? There’s only one way to find out for sure—get on board one, nail the throttle, and take that test ride for yourself.


Other Choices: For a model that’s a bit less bassy and a bit more multi-species, check out the Tracker Pro Guide V 16 SC. Or, if you want the protection of a full windshield, a boat like the Smoker Craft 162 Pro Angler might be of interest.

 

10 Bass Boats that Will Blow You Away: Cast Action Heroes

If you’re a diehard freshwater angler looking for a new bass boat, these 10 will all be of interest—they cover the spectrum from budget-busters to economy models, from simple aluminum fishing boats to high-tech composite construction, from small pocket-rockets to large luxury fishing machines. Whatever flavor you fancy, if largemouth bass are the target, one of these fishing machines belongs in your arsenal.


This article originally appeared on boats.com. Republished by permission. 


 

Strap down those fishing rods and hold on tight - the Allison XB-2002 is the fastest bass boat in the world.
Strap down those fishing rods and hold on tight – the Allison XB-2002 is the fastest bass boat in the world.

Allison XB-2002 – With a top-end speed that can break 116-mph, the Allison XB-2002 ranks as the world’s fastest bass boat. Sure, it has all the usual stuff like livewells, pedestal seats, and fishfinders. Yeah, it’s built with a steel-reinforced transom, foam-core I-beam sandwich construction, and a setback transom. But what we really care about is the fact that you can run this thing faster than some single-engine airplanes. For more information, visit Allison.

Few bass boats can handle 350 horses on the transom, and the Bass Cat Jaguar is one of them.
Few bass boats can handle 350 horses on the transom, and the Bass Cat Jaguar is one of them.

Bass Cat Jaguar – If you’re looking for a top-end bass boat which can handle the largest outboards built, run at speeds fast enough to get you a ticket on I-95, and has all of the luxury appointments you yearn for—like bucket seats, an iPod/USB stereo, a tandem-axle trailer, and a ginormous six-foot forward casting deck—this could be your next boat. And the Bass Cat’s construction is just as impressive, featuring vacuum-bagging, pedestal mounts which are reinforced and glassed to the hull to eliminate deck fatigue, and custom wiring harnesses designed for each specific boat. For more information, visit Bass Cat.

A fishing kayak like the Hobie will get you into the tight areas that hold bass - and not other anglers.
A fishing kayak like the Hobie will get you into the tight areas that hold bass – and not other anglers.

Hobie Mirage Pro Angler – This fishing kayak made our list of the Top 10 Fishing Boats of 2012 for the same reasons it makes the grade as a top bass fishing machine: it’s a hands-free, uber-comfortable fishing machine which can poke and probe into tight creeks, ponds, and coves where other boats dare not tread. If you want to be able to access shockingly skinny water and reach those spots that other anglers only dream of casting to, check out the Mirage Pro. For more information, read our full review (Hobie Mirage Pro Angler 12: Fish From a Kayak You Can Paddle or Peddle) or visit Hobie.

A boat doesn't have to be fiberglass - nor expensive - to get you into the bass fishing game.
A boat doesn’t have to be fiberglass – nor expensive – to get you into the bass fishing game.

Lowe Stinger 175 – If you want to be a competitive bass angler, there’s a minimum level of performance you simply must reach. And while most fiberglass bass boats that run in the 40-mph range carry a substantial price tag, an aluminum rig that makes the grade and costs a whole lot less—around $15,000—is the Lowe Stinger 175. Is it the fanciest bass boat around? Nope. Is it the fastest? Uh-uh. Does it come with all the features of a top-shelf model? Forgeddaboudit. But if you want to get into competition for the lowest cost possible, this boat is your ticket. For more information, see our Lowe Stinger 175 video boat review or visit Lowe.

Nitro is one of the most popular bass boat brands around, thanks to models like the Z-6.
Nitro is one of the most popular bass boat brands around, thanks to models like the Z-6.

Nitro Z-6 – As one of the most popular builders around, Nitro can offer economy of scale and maximum bang for the buck. And if you want a production fiberglass bass boat that offers solid performance at the lower end of the cost spectrum, the Z-6 is a model you’re sure to be looking at. It MSRP’s under $20,000 (with a trailer and a 115-hp Mercury outboard), can hit speeds in the low to mid 50’s, and at 17’4” long with a 2,400 pound tow load, is easy to handle getting to and from the ramp. For more information, visit Nitro Boats.

Ranger Z21 I – The Ranger Z21 I earns its place in the top 10 by offering a unique fiberglass interior which is designed to allow for saltwater use. The layout and design, however, still screams of bass fishing. That means this model will serve you well on the lake yet you can also use it to probe bays and estuaries where brackish water bass are on the prowl. For more information, visit Ranger Boats.

Bassing one day, going for redfish the next? Then you need a freshwater/saltwater bass boat hybrid, like the Ranger Z21 I.
Bassing one day, going for redfish the next? Then you need a freshwater/saltwater bass boat hybrid, like the Ranger Z21 I.
The Ranger Z522: when size matters.
The Ranger Z522: when size matters.

Ranger Z522 Commanche – Another Ranger appears here for one simple reason: at 22’4” LOA and a beam of just over eight feet, the Z522 Comanche is one of the biggest bass boats on the water. Few dedicated bass fishing machines break the 22’ barrier, and if size matters to you but you refuse to budge one inch in the performance department—with 300 horses on the transom this rig breaks 71-mph—the Z522 is a top pick. For more information, visit Ranger Boats.

Skeeter FX 20 – All boats present some form of compromise, and all too often, that compromise is performance. Not so, with the FX 20. This model was designed specifically for the Yamaha VMAX SHO V6 outboards, the four-stroke powerplants that have the performance and weight of a two-stroke. The boat’s weight distribution was designed to be optimal with the SHO on the transom, and the aft end of the hull was shaped to feed water to the prop as the boat comes onto plane, speeding hole-shot. Net result? Blistering top-end speeds in excess of 75-mph. We ran this boat with the VMAX SHO, so for more information, read The New Yamaha Four Stroke VMAX, or visit Skeeter.

The Skeeter FX 20 and a Yamaha VMAX SHO: a match made in boat-building heaven.
The Skeeter FX 20 and a Yamaha VMAX SHO: a match made in boat-building heaven.
Pontoons are too popular to leave off this list, and the Sun Tracker Bass Buggy is a top model.
Pontoons are too popular to leave off this list, and the Sun Tracker Bass Buggy is a top model.

Sun Tracker 16 Bass Buggy – While this is hardly what you’d call a competition bass boat, no top 10 bass boat list would be complete without a pontoon—they’re among the most-used platforms for bass fishing across the nation. And the Bass Buggy 16 is worthy of note because it’s shockingly inexpensive (under $10,00 with a 20-hp outboard), and it includes basics like a livewell, Bimini top, and pedestal seats. For more information see our review (Sun Tracker Bass Buggy 16: A Pontoon Boat For Under $10,000 – Yes!), visit Sun tracker Boats, or find out why the Bass Buggy 16 also made our list of the Top 10 Pontoon Boats.

The Tracker Pro 160 is a good bet for budget-minded anglers.
The Tracker Pro 160 is a good bet for budget-minded anglers.

Tracker Pro 160 – This is the smallest dedicated bass boat to make our list, because it will be of interest to budget-minded anglers. With a list price of under $9,000 (which gets you the boat along with a 20-hp outboard and a custom-matched galvanized trailer) the Tracker Pro 160 has everything you need to hit the lake and get into the game: a Lowrance X-4 Pro fishfinder, a Minn Kota trolling motor, rodracks for four rigs up to seven feet long, and a nine-gallon aerated livewell. Will this be the fastest, fanciest, best equipped boat on the water? Heck no—but if your budget is a priority, you won’t find a more complete bass boat package for less. For more information, visit Tracker Boats.

 

Fishing Boats

This article originally appeared on boats.com. Republished by permission.


 

Would you like to own a fishing boat? Since you’ve ended up here on this web page, we’re betting it’s crossed your mind. And we’re not surprised—there are a lot of angling boaters out there and according to the latest figures, over 389,000,000 fishing trips took place on boats in American waters in 2013 (the last year figures are available for). Over 22 million Americans own their own boat, over half of all boating outings include fishing, and boats used for fishing range from one-man kayaks to 100’ long yachts that carry dozens of anglers.

Fishing boats come in all shapes and sizes. The one common denominator: they all make for big, big smiles.
Fishing boats come in all shapes and sizes. The one common denominator: they all make for big, big smiles.

If you’re in the market for a fishing boat—or you just think you might be one day soon—there will be a lot of tough decision-making in your future. Purchasing a boat isn’t to be taken lightly, and we hope you’ll do lots of research before deciding just what type to get, much less finding the exact boat you want to buy. We’re also quite glad that you found us. Because helping you do that research is what we’re all about. It’s not all out of altruism, of course. Yes, we do have listings here on boats.com, numbering well over 200,000 at this very moment. And we certainly hope you’ll peruse those listings once you figure out exactly what type and size boat will fit the bill. But until that time comes, we’ll do our best to coach you through your research from several different angles.

WHAT’S THAT BOAT MADE OF?

Modern fishing boats are usually made of aluminum, fiberglass, or in some cases (usually for small boats like car-toppers, kayaks, and canoes) rotationally molded plastic. The differences between these construction materials are significant, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Here are five of the most important (if somewhat oversimplified) basic traits for each:

Aluminum

  • Lighter than fiberglass or plastic.
  • Less expensive than fiberglass.
  • Dents instead of shattering.
  • Requires very little maintenance.
  • Difficult to form into complex hull shapes.
The Tracker Pro Guide V-16 is a great example of a common aluminum fishing boat.
The Tracker Pro Guide V-16 is a great example of a common aluminum fishing boat.

For more information about aluminum as a boatbuilding material, read Aluminum Fishing Boats: Light, Economical, and Seaworthy. And for an interesting take on welded aluminum boats versus riveted construction, read Lund vs. Crestliner.

Fiberglass

  • Heavier than aluminum or plastic.
  • More expensive than aluminum or plastic.
  • Looks magnificent compared to boats built from other materials.
  • Requires more maintenance than aluminum or plastic.
  • Molded construction allows for complex hullforms, integrated features, and built-in compartments.
Complex hullforms, like the twin-stepped Contender hull seen here, are usually molded from fiberglass.
Complex hullforms, like the twin-stepped Contender hull seen here, are usually molded from fiberglass.

For more information on fiberglass as a boatbuilding material, read Shifts in Fiberglass, and watch Boating Tips: Understanding Vacuum Bagging, and Boating Tips: Understanding Foam Cored Boat Construction.

Plastic

  • Lighter and in most cases less expensive than fiberglass (this becomes less true as boat size increases).
  • Plastic is extremely rugged, and when dented, returns to original form.
  • Looks are not as good as painted aluminum or fiberglass.
  • Requires zero maintenance.
  • Molded construction allows for complex hullforms, integrated features, and built-in compartments.
Rotomolded plastic boats are usually small, but they have a number of advantages.
Rotomolded plastic boats are usually small, but they have a number of advantages.

For more information on rotationally molded plastic as a boatbuilding material, read Rotomolded Dinghies. Also see Triumph 186 Sportsman: Roplene Plastic Fantastic to learn about Triumph’s proprietary rotationally molded Roplene polyethylene boats.

Whichever material they’re made from, fishing boats do, of course, vary quite a bit from one to another. In their most basic forms, we can divide them into two categories: those used for fishing in freshwater ponds, lakes, and rivers, and those used for fishing in saltwater bays and oceans. While these three construction materials are used for both categories of fishing boats, as a general rule of thumb, plastic is used for the smallest boats (commonly up to 12′), aluminum is used for small and medium-sized boats (up into the mid-20-foot size range) and fiberglass is used for medium sized and larger boats (16′ and larger, with no limit). Still, there are plenty of differences between freshwater and saltwater fishing boats.

FRESHWATER FISHING BOATS

Freshwater fishing boats can range in size from the 10-foot-long dinghies used on small ponds, all the way up to big 30-foot-plus cabin boats used on big waters like the Great Lakes. They also range in how specialized they are. And for many boaters, this is where things can get confusing. Sure, there are some designs that are merely intended for general fishing use. The best examples of these are jon boats. Jon boats are, in their most basic form, hulls with bench seats and an outboard motor on the back. This simplicity makes them some of the most affordable boats around.

Many new boaters are surprised when they find out just how affordable a jon boat or skiff can be.
Many new boaters are surprised when they find out just how affordable a jon boat or skiff can be.

Pontoon boats are another good example of all-around freshwater fishing boats. They’re commonly designed for multiple activities ranging from fishing to water skiing, yet their large decks and open layouts mean they can be used for a wide range of forms of fishing. And yes, you can find pontoon boats that have been specialized to be fishing platforms. Read more about all the options in Pontoon Boat Basics.

At the other end of the spectrum, you have highly specialized freshwater fishing boats like bass boats and dual-consoles. When it comes to the specific fishing mission they’re designed for, these are usually superior to do-it-all craft like jon boats and pontoons. But on the flip side, they don’t adapt well to different fisheries. That bass boat may rule the reservoir when it comes to casting the shorelines for largemouth, but it can’t hold a candle to a properly outfitted pontoon boat if you want to troll for walleye. And if you decide to take the kids water skiing or wakeboarding instead of fishing for an afternoon, a specialized fishing boat is probably one of the worst options around.

Bass fishing? Yes. Water skiing? Ummmm...
Bass fishing? Yes. Water skiing? Ummmm…

For more information on the boats used for freshwater fishing in general and to learn about some of the different designs, power options, and variables, read Freshwater Fishing Boats.

SALTWATER FISHING BOATS

Anglers heading for saltwater bays or out into the ocean, naturally, need a very different type of boat than most freshwater fishermen. In many cases they must be larger, and better able to handle big seas. But in all cases, they have to be built with different hardware, wiring, and other components that resist corrosion. A boat intended for freshwater use only won’t last very long in the brine. Those designed and built for saltwater use, on the other hand, can be used in freshwater without any problems—and many anglers do go both ways. In fact, 56 percent of the boat owners who went fishing in 2013 cast their lines in freshwater and 21 percent tried their luck in saltwater, but 23 percent went fishing in both fresh and saltwater.

As with freshwater fishing boats, those built for saltwater use range greatly in both size and specialization. In fact, due to the radically different fisheries, conditions, and distances involved in different types of saltwater fishing, even though the market is smaller there are more types of specialized saltwater fishing boats than there are freshwater fishing boats.

Many saltwater boats, like this <A HREF="https://www.boats.com/reviews/maverick-hpx-v-ii-flats-boat-fantasy/">Maverick HPX-V II</A>"technical poling skiff ," are highly specialized for specific fisheries.
Many saltwater boats, like this Maverick HPX-V II “technical poling skiff ,” are highly specialized for specific fisheries.

In general, center-console fishing boats are about the most versatile models you’ll find on the water. But even these are more or less specialized for different fisheries. Bay boats, for example, are center-consoles designed for estuarine fishing for species like redfish and speckled sea trout. Center-console yachts like the Hydrasports 53 Suenos, the largest of its kind, are designed for runs through the open ocean—and could never fish in the shallow waterways a bay boat thrives in. Yet both are most certainly center-consoles.

For more information on the boats used for saltwater fishing in general and to learn about some of the different designs, power options, and variables, read Saltwater Fishing Boats.

HOW BIG IS BIG ENOUGH?

This is a question our boating experts hear all the time. And unfortunately, there’s no easy answer. Some 20-footers are capable of handling rougher seas than some boats twice their size. And some that would be perfectly safe on a calm afternoon could be woefully out of place on the very same body of water when a front rolls through and weather conditions get bad.

Essentially, it all boils down to judgment calls. It’s best to own a boat for a while and learn its capabilities, before pushing to larger waters and tougher conditions.

We hope that you don’t feel overwhelmed at this point, but owning a fishing boat is sort of a big deal. Yes, those of you new to boats will have to learn a lot. Shopping for your new boat may take a long time. And in truth, for a fishing boat owner, the learning and researching never really ends. But trust us, it’s worth it. You’ll think so, too, once you pull away from the dock in your own fishing boat. We’d bet our bottom dollar.